Photography in Web Design by Mark Johnstone Photography & Design

Many UX designers underrate the importance of good photography in web design. But in fact, photography in web design is an essential factor to make your website have a soul and heart, look professional, and most importantly, telling a story of your products, your brand, services.

Imagery is more than decoration. It’s a robust tool to help you communicate and differentiate your product. Vision is the strongest human sense; it is an excellent and fastest way to grab user’s attention.

USEFUL TIPS ON HOW TO USE PHOTOGRAPHY IN WEB DESIGN

Use predictive visuals to enhance the user experience. Don’t make it complicated, don’t use philosophy images, which won’t be understood by most of your users. Simplify the life of your clients, reinforce the message of your statement or brand with the use of relevant, personal and emotional photos. Content with relevant pictures gets 94% more views than content without relevant images

Personalize your photos especially if you take it from the stock to have your brand name. You can also use your brand’s colour palette, etc

Customize stock photography in web design Glasgow. Work with your UX designer to make images more unique and wonderful. Tactics like photo filters, layering, cropping, using stylized typography, adding elements and more can take the stock image to a new level, where people would think that this is related to your brand.

No matter what cool photos you have in your library, they will rarely be suitable for the task. You need photography in web design that has been taken for this particular purpose, by an expert and with a brief from both customer and designer. To have a relevant picture with a story, that will drive emotions.

Add your personal touch. Think about photographs that would reflect your identity, don’t use photos that all other companies use. Do something different, be you!

6. TRY TO STAY AWAY FROM STOCK

Use imagery to represent a distinctive voice and show creative excellence. For particular content, use specific imagery. For more abstract content, be interpretive. The photographic stock is neither interpretive nor specific. Strive for pictures that represent your story.

7. DON’T USE PHOTOGRAPH JUST TO FILL THE PAGE

Sometimes designers are motivated to use an image on a website just to have one, just to fill the blank space. Jakob Nielsen, a very known researcher, conducted an eye-tracking study to examine the impact of images on websites and In his study, Nielsen observed that participants ignored photos when they there was no aim other than to fill the page with a visual.

8. HAVE A POINT OF FOCUS

Have an iconic object of focus in your photo. Ensure that a clear concept is conveyed to the user memorably. Use colour and theme to give images a clear focus. Avoid making the users struggling with finding out the meaning in the picture. The most powerful iconic photos consist of a few meaningful elements, with minimal distractions.

9. HUMANIZE YOUR WEBSITE, TELL A STORY

Define the mood through visual storytelling. A photo that tells a story is infinitely more informative and interesting, rather than just having an image of people smiling with no story behind it. A photo that lacks a story misses an opportunity to convey mood, brand, and context. 47% of marketers say photography is critical to their current marketing and storytelling strategies.